Cybersecurity Tips Blog

We've all seen the pop-up windows telling us that our computer is infected with a virus or other malware. Don't be fooled; the real malware could be the free software and/or free offer to fix your PC.

Oftentimes the ads and warnings are fake and will cause damage to your PC and to the security of your personal information. Fake software can install malware and obtain personal information from your PC and send it to the bad guys.

Once information is online, sometimes it can be impossible to remove. Therefore, you should be conscientious of your visible online presence, also known as your digital footprint. Criminals and fraudsters may utilize this information against you in various ways. The more information that is out there, the more information that is accessible for social engineering and ID theft scams. Additionally, this content may be accessed at some point by an outside source doing an assessment of you, such as for college admission or a new job.

Be cautious of what you post online, and use the recommendations below to manage your digital footprint!

Recommendations

  • Map your digital footprint.

  • Look at all the social networking sites and forums that you belong to, and search what information about you is available.

  • Clean up your digital footprint.

  • Remove any photos, content, and links that may be inappropriate or reveal too much information.

  • Be selective about who you authorize to ac...

Don't leave your computer vulnerable. Keep your systems patched and up-to-date with the latest security patches from vendors. Doing so will help prevent worm infections and keep your systems protected.

Google works hard to help protect against phishing attacks—from using machine learning, to tailoring detection algorithms, to building features to spot previously unseen attacks. While they block as many external attacks as they can, they continue to build and offer features designed to empower IT administrators to develop strong internal defenses against phishing.

Here are seven things they recommend admins do in G Suite to better protect employee data.

1. Enforce 2-step verification
Two-step verification (2SV) is one of the best ways to prevent someone from accessing your account, even if they steal your password. In G Suite, admins have the ability to enforce 2-step verification. 2SV can reduce the risk of successful phishing attacks by asking employees for additional proof of identity when they sign in. This can be in the form of phone prompts, voice calls, mobile app notifications and more.

G Suite also supports user-managed security keys—easy to use hardware authenticators. Admi...

A password is only as secure as the computer or network it is used on. As such, never log in to a sensitive account from a public computer, such as computers in a cyber cafe, hotel lobby or conference hall. Bad guys target public computers such as these and infect them on purpose. The moment you type your password on an infected computer, these cyber criminals can harvest your passwords. If you have no choice but to use a public computer, change your password at the next available opportunity you have access to a trusted computer.

Did you know that according to the Verizon, you are 16 times more likely to lose a laptop or mobile devices than have it stolen? When you are traveling, always double-check to make sure you have your mobile device with you, such as when you finish going through airport security, leave your taxi or check out of your hotel.

"Cyber ethics" refers to the code of responsible behavior on the Internet. Just as we are taught to act responsibly in everyday life with lessons such as "Don't take what doesn't belong to you" and "Do not harm others," we must act responsibly in the cyber world as well.

The basic rule is "Do not do something in cyberspace that you would consider wrong or illegal in everyday life."

Considerations When Determining Responsible Behavior

  • Do not use rude or offensive language.

  • Do not cyberbully.

  • Do not plagiarize.

  • Do not break into someone else's computer.

  • Do not use someone else's password.

  • Do not attempt to infect or in any way try to make someone else's computer unusable.

  • Adhere to copyright restrictions when downloading material from the Internet, including software, games, movies, or music.

We've all seen the pop-up windows telling us that our computer is infected with a virus or other malware. Don't be fooled; the real malware could be the free software and/or free offer to fix your PC.

Oftentimes the ads and warnings are fake and will cause damage to your PC and to the security of your personal information. Fake software can install malware and obtain personal information from your PC and send it to the bad guys.

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You don’t need fame or millions of dollars in the bank to become the victim of cybercrime. Many cyber-criminals rely on automated attacks that seek out and compromise all vulnerable systems. Once a system is compromised, it can be used to distribute malware, send spam, or help launch a denial of service attack. Cyber-criminals may also lift personal data from vulnerable systems to use for identity theft and fraud.

The term "cybercrime" is usually referred to as any criminal offense committed against or with the use of a computer or computer network. A cybercrime incident can lead to loss of business and consumer confidence, financial loss, productivity loss, and even loss of intellectual property.

If you become a victim of a cybercrime, you should report the incident to the appropriate law enforcement authorities. Depending on the scope of the crime, the appropriate agency may be local, state, federal, or even international.

Report a cybercrime to:
-Department of Justice: Reporting Computer, Internet-Related, or Intellectual Property Crime
-Federal Bureau of Investigation: Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3)

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